Export Terms

The AECA is the statute that authorizes the export and temporary import control activities of the Department of State (DOS). The AECA is the basic authority for the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC) to issue regulations, and to administer and enforce export and temporary import controls for national security and foreign policy.

A list of items subject to Bureau of Industry and Security export license requirements based on their identity. The Commerce Control List (CCL) is found in Supplement 1 to Part 774 of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). [NOTE: EAR99 items are not on the CCL.]

The office in the Department of State (DOS) that administers licenses for defense services and defense (munitions) articles.  Formerly known as the Office of Defense Trade Controls.

Regulations set forth in parts 730-774, of Title 15 of the Code of Federal Regulations(CFR), and issued by the Department of Commerce to implement the Export Administration Act (EAA) and other statutory requirements. The EAR is amended by rules published in the Federal Register.

Individual categories of items on the Commerce Control List (CCL) are identified by an Export Control Classification Number (ECCN).

An Export Compliance Program is an optional program to assist exporters in complying with the Export Regulatory Responsibilities.

Export Control Reform Initiative is a common sense approach to overhauling the nation’s export control system to meet the current and anticipated U.S. national security and foreign policy objectives of the 21st century.

A principal operating unit of the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) responsible for the enforcement of export controls on “dual-use” items. EE also enforces the Export Administration Act’s (EAA) antiboycott provisions and the Fastener Quality Act.

(15 CFR, Part 30) Issued by the Bureau of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce to regulate the preparation and filing of the Shipper’s Export Declaration (SED) by exporters, freight forwarders, and ocean carriers.

IEEPA grants the President emergency power to respond to a threat to the U.S. national security, foreign policy, or the economy from abroad. Presidents have used IEEPA to continue the Export Administration Regulations in force during lapses of the Export Administration Act. IEEPA is found at 50 U.S.C. §1701 et seq.

Governs the export and temporary import of defense articles and services under State Department jurisdiction. Regulations set forth in Parts 120-130 of Title 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and issued by the Department of State to implement the Arms Export Control Act (AECA) and other statutory requirements. The ITAR is amended by rules published in the Federal Register.

To strengthen America’s economy, support additional jobs in the U.S., and ensure long-term, sustainable growth, President Obama launched a government-wide strategy to promote exports. The National Export Initiative (NEI) is one essential component of that strategy.

A symbol entered on the Shipper’s Export Declaration (SED), certifying that no BIS export license is required.

OAC is responsible for implementing the antiboycott provisions of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). This office performs three main functions: (1) enforcing the regulations; (2) assisting the public in antiboycott compliance; and (3) compiling and analyzing information regarding international boycotts.

OEE is responsible for investigating violations of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and the Fastener Quality Act; apprehending violators; and recommending the prosecution of violators. OEE also conducts outreach to educate U.S. exporters how to identify and avoid illegal transactions.

The list of defense articles, technology and services under the export and temporary import jurisdiction of the State Department. The USML is found in Part 121 of the ITAR. The USML is amended by rules published in the Federal Register.